About your Search

20121006
20121014
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12
, how would you describe the jobs economy and right now? guest: this is the weakest recovery we have had since world war ii. the jobs numbers each month, we have averaged around 145,000 jobs created per month this year. that is barely enough to keep up with the growth of the working age population. and it has been a somewhat brazilian recovery in that there have been a lot of fears that we would go back into recession at various times and that has not happened. the overall economy has grown roughly 2% since the recession ended in june, 2009. that is a fairly weak growth rate, particularly after the death of the recession. by many measures, this is easily the worst since the great depression corporate -- the great depression. the modest and sometimes weak growth we have had has made it very difficult for the unemployed. we have long-term unemployed, those are of work for six months or even a year, that has been a record -- at record levels. ben bernanke has long term crashes -- the prices of long- term unemployment. -- the crisis of long-term unemployment. host: let's begin with a call fr
and the greatest peacetime expansion of our economy in the nation's history. by contrast, the decade checked by bush tax rates squandered our budget surpluses, produced net- jobs and culminated in the great recession. the lesson here is that the contrary -- is that contrary to supply-side economics, the level of the top rate does not by itself dictate what happens to gdp. a balanced budget aided by increased revenues just might restore confidence to investors and jump-start our economy. for the third and final element of this tax reform model, we turn to investment income. it is time to reduce the sizable differential and the tax treatment of earned and unearned income. the reduction in the capital gains rate to 15% under president bush was a major contributor to the growth and wealth disparities we see today. the top 1% on average received 20% of incoming capital gains, 10 times as much as the rest of the country. capital gains makes up 60% of the income recorded by the forbes 400. the extremely low 50% rate in effect today is an allied air. it is the lowest rate on investment income since
the inevitable ups and downs of incoming data, it appears the economy is growing at such a pace that absent policy action, progress, and reducing unemployment will likely be so for some time. in the meantime inflation is subdued, running at or below our long-run objective of 2%, while longer run inflation expectations remain well anchored. the federal funds rate were 3%, we would have in my view an open and shut case for lowering it. the complication, of course, is that the funds is at its lower bound which means we can't turn that dial further. we have to use unconventional tools such as land guidance about the future path of the funds rate. with respect to lsaps, my belief, this echos the views that chairman bernanke expressed at jackson hole, is that prior rounds of lsaps have placed a significant role in supporting activity and in preventing a worrisome undershoot of our inflation objective. the case is especially strong with respect to the first round of lsaps which was a very potent piece of policy action that helped to bring the economy back from the brink in 2009. however, we now fa
country, and that is jobs in the economy. congressman murphy doesn't have a plan. yes not put a plan fourth to address these issues. you can look online and see exactly what i plan to do. they now have a track record of creating jobs and adding to the economy and they know i'm going to take that skill set to washington in a congress where we have so few business people who come from the private sector. blacks why can't the press come along and monitor this -- >> why can't the press, along and monitor this question are >> the press does come along. >> this campaign is about the people of the state of connecticut. i ran into a guy just a couple of weeks ago, and out of work painter and he wants to know the differences between linda and i between how we're going to put him back on the job. they're big differences. when the's plan is focused on giving herself a $7 million tax cut and hoping that trickles down to people who need help. my plan is focused on investing in the people of this state and funding our schools and building roads and bridges and we recognize the strength of our nati
-you to a keen observer on washington politics and the economy, as well who as a great moderator. and thank you to our panelists. we really appreciate you all being here. i would also like to again thank our sponsors at bloomberg government, the roth political report -- and a reminder that if you enjoyed today, we do this for state of the industry conferences. a reminder -- in four weeks, election day will be held. a couple of days afterward, we will have a major event at the chamber, on the morning of november 8. we hope you will mark our -- mark your calendars and join us. thank you very much, and have a great day. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> both presidential candidates are in ohio, with rallies this afternoon. mitt romney is a kind of false -- is at the falls. the president fifth event at ohio state university will start shortly. meanwhile, a discussion of how the presidential race shapes up. >> we will be getting electoral scoreboard updates from a lot of publications. today, we feature "the
into the economy. about $150 a week more for white womenton average, for women of color somewhere between $250 and $350. and it would be injected into the economy. we are going to spend it and it is going to create jobs. so wherever we look, i think we see what's at stake because, of course, the folks that would have to pay that equal pay don't want to pay it. women are in the world at large are the single greatest source of cheap labor and unpaid labor and that is a source of rstens, right. and we are also the means of reproduction. hello, if we were not the means of reproduction, we would be fine because it is necessary to nationalism, there are only two pill lars of nationalism, controlling territory and population. it is necessary for our means and cheap labor, it is necessary to control reproduction in order to perp wait racial divisions and class divisions and eth nick divisions. you have to isolate the support women so they maintain the purity of some group and exploit the women who are supposedly not the support women in order to create cheap labor. i'm sure that we were all having hea
the united states economy. the price and economic impact would be much greater if these occurred. we hope that this paper which is a departure from the focus of most papers on the consequences of a nuclear iran or a nuclear capable iran will trigger a new discussion and enable an expanded debate on the topic. i would like to introduce michael, the foreign policy director of the bpc, a former oil analyst to boot. he directed this effort and will review some of the key findings. he will introduce our very distinguished panel. mike. >> thank you, senator. thank you everyone for coming. as the senator said, the purpose of this report is really to trigger a debate. we are not suggesting that we have all of the answers, but we wanted to introduce a new dimension to the debate about iran about preventing a nuclear iran. we are not -- focusing on the economics, we are not suggesting the economic issues should drive united states policy one way or another. but it has definitely come up in the debate. it has been raised, certainly in terms of let us say about the impact on sanctions and military, s
campaign and white house were aware that they had a very ugly economy and the comments really do not get reelected under these types of economies. they have always come across as hungrier and more aggressive than the romney campaign. in almost every respect. they were ready for a fight from the get go. >> this is what makes the debate so puzzling. the campaign has been hungry. look at the advertising they have been running. really smart advertising. >> who is running the obama campaign? david axelrod? obama? who is running the romney campaign? is the family intervening? >> from the white house, david pluft was the campaign manager in 2008 when they were underdogs. now the senior adviser in the white house. he has the last word on most things in the campaign and in the white house. ji messina, the cam -- the campaign manager in chicago runs an organization carried on the run inside, romney, ceo. when people look back at that campaign, a big factor people will look at is how a this as a person could have created a campaign that has such fuzzy lines of accountability, a campaign management
of everything, and agriculture, oil and gas, natural resources. our recreation economy is $3 billion a year in this state to make sure we have opportunities for recreation out there. do not tell me it can be just one industry. it has to be a bunch of industries out there. >> thank you. we have run out of time for questions. and we will give each candidate to minutes for closing statements about their campaign to be montana's representatives in the u.s. senate. senator tester will go first, followed by rep river. >> i want to thank everybody in the audience and on the panel and everyone who is listening tonight. how many people in this audience are from the silly -- the city of billings. raise your hand. thank you very much. congressman rewhberg is suing each and everyone of you. i have talked about montana and people working together. the first thing you do when you've got a grass fire, the firefighters put it out and they put their but on their line and you do not respond and say thank you by filing a lawsuit, which is exactly what he did. that is not moving the committee forward. it has b
months ago. the economy is under pressure. we have made clear as the number ellen did council has made clear that -- north atlantic council has made clear that the assault on turkey's sovereignty is unacceptable. we stand by our turkey's allies. >> the iraq commissioner said he is stepping down november 9. was that -- will the present bill that position quickly? >> i have no personnel announcements to make today. none today. >> tim from bloomberg news. at the hearing today about been , the request from libya for more security was rejected by the state department. was the white house involved with the discussions or the determinations? >> i am not going to get into specifics under review by the accountability review board. i would point you to testimony being delivered by officials close to the facts about our diplomatic security posture as we speak on capitol hill in the very hearings that you referenced. the present's position has been that we need to ensure the safety and security of our diplomatic facilities and our diplomatic personnel. it is unquestionable that our civilian person
: it would probably be good for the economy, getting a few people back to work, but as far as driving people away from home again, nah -- host: thank you for calling in. next up is charlotte in georgia on the republican line. what did you think? caller: and so impressed with governor romney. i am so excited to vote for a president that has america plus interests at heart. i believe this man can turn america crown. -- around. [indiscernbile] and knowledge that we are not going to stand for it, this nonsense going on overseas, america needs to wake up and look at this man and vote for romney. host: that was charlotte in georgia. we received several dozen tweets on this issue. i want to read some very quickly. paul says romney will have an unapologetic for policy. he is a leader we need and deserve. dom says not impressed, mitt. leo -- is this speech about a bomb or foreign policy? he does not have one. suzanne says clear conditions for aid to egypt, including honoring peace treaty with israel, way to go, mitt.e and from weston, romney says u.s. mess lead in the world. caller: 84 taking my call
. tribal interest for economy competed with each other resulted in firefights. it was a common occurrence. when i first arrived on the ground in tripoli, i could recognize celebratory gunfire from actual gun fire fights. that did die off a little bit, however, we did notice an increase in targeted attacks towards americans. these indicators spelled out that the country was far from secure and the sst was still in need at that location. >> in a document that was produced in late july, and i have the document right here, over 230 events in libya since june of 2011. mr. nordstrom included in this in as part of the general assessment. prior to this attack on our embassy, the red cross and the british consulate moved out of libya. >> yes, sir, that is entirely correct. the british consulate moved out and they had an mou with us to leave their vehicles and weapons on our compound and benghazi. they would do their work and then leave. the attack on the international red cross was another attack that also involved us and threats to the compound in benghazi. the price for made on facebook -- the t
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12